Women and Prohibition Powerpoint

Women and Prohibition Powerpoint

I’m sharing one of my favorite powerpoints that I have created for a lecture on women and the prohibition movement.  It touches on the Women’s Temperance movement in the 1800s and leads up into Prohibition and the emergence of the “new woman” of the 1920s.  Please feel free to use this presentation to your liking.  Download it, change it, use it as you wish!  Click the link above to view it on SlideShare.  From there you can download it.  If you have problems, just email or post a comment below and I’d be happy to email it or dropbox it to you.

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Immigration Timeline

So for the past few months, off and on because of personal events that have thrown me off course, I have been working on a timeline of immigration and citizenship laws in the United States.  Please let me know if I have missed any as I most likely have.  I hope this is helpful!  I know I will definitely be using this in a classroom.  I had limited space for extended information and references, so if you’re curious, just send me an email and I will get you what you need.

You can view it here, since I can’t figure out how to embed it into this post…

If you’d like to create your own timeline, I highly recommend TimeToast.  It is an easy to use (and free!) website.

Tip of the Week: MapStory. It’s Wikipedia for Maps

This is brilliant and ridiculously helpful for social studies teachers looking for a way to incorporate a different level of map understanding and use in a classroom. I look forward to incorporating this tool into my curriculum! Thanks History Tech for keeping us up on these wonderful tools!

History Tech

Okay. Not sure if I should be impressed or freaked out by the fact that the founder of MapStory was also one of the original officers of In-Q-Tel. In-Q-Tel, as we all know, is the venture capital group working to keep the CIA equipped with the latest in information technology.

I’m gonna go with freakishly impressed.

Because MapStory looks like a very handy tool for teachers looking for ways to incorporate high-level discipline specific thinking skills into their geography and history instruction. And I’m sure there’s not any chance of teachers getting caught up in some sort of illegal international information gathering syndicate through MapStory.

Pretty sure.

Yesterday I shared some thoughts about using maps to to help generate great questions related to the Kansas state social studies standards and the Common Core. Part of what I didn’t talk about was the last part:

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History Harvest: Community Collectives

New York TimesThe January 2013 issue of the Perspectives on History highlighted a project of the students and faculty of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln called History Harvest.  The article called to me about a way to collect the information that is most often lost- that of the community in which we all live.  Everyone has those personal historical documents tucked away in a closet, attic, or basement that we think about rarely (or sometimes often).  These documents have a personal value, but also a historical value regarding culture and social of our given communities.  It’s a shame to let those documents sit, forgotten, tucked away when they could be digitized for use by historians and students.

The co-directors William G. Thomas and Patrick D. Jones started this project “to create a popular movement to democratize and open American history by utilizing digital technologies to share the experiences and artifacts of everyday people and local historical institutions.”  People from the community are invited to these harvest gatherings with their personal items and histories to have them digitized with photographs and digital stories.  Local organizations, museums, and others are also welcome to bring items to be digitized.

Students are heavily involved, creating, planning, and advertising for their harvest.  Its an excellent hands on experience for the students to learn what history means to people in their community and how everyone can contribute in some way.  It’s a fascinating project that begs for duplication in communities across the United States and the world.

Needless to say, I would be highly interested in starting my own “History Harvest” in my community with students.  If you would be too, you can contact the co-directors via the links on their names above or contacting them through their website at: http://historyharvest.unl.edu/